Y’all there is just not enough time for all the fanart I want to draw. Doodled this after seeing some of Kris Anka’s Winter Soldier drawings. Our friend Adam drew one, too.
Also, it’s my first time using REAL deleter screentone. I had to try it out after seeing Helen Chen put it to such great use.
Anyway. It’s 4x6”. Ink, screentone, vibranium. Y’all there is just not enough time for all the fanart I want to draw. Doodled this after seeing some of Kris Anka’s Winter Soldier drawings. Our friend Adam drew one, too.
Also, it’s my first time using REAL deleter screentone. I had to try it out after seeing Helen Chen put it to such great use.
Anyway. It’s 4x6”. Ink, screentone, vibranium.

Y’all there is just not enough time for all the fanart I want to draw. Doodled this after seeing some of Kris Anka’s Winter Soldier drawings. Our friend Adam drew one, too.

Also, it’s my first time using REAL deleter screentone. I had to try it out after seeing Helen Chen put it to such great use.

Anyway. It’s 4x6”. Ink, screentone, vibranium.

Weasley is our King.

Ink and colored pencil on paper for #WizardingWednesday.

Q

thirtyfourth asked:

Dear Jake, what a fantastic artist and storyteller you are! Thanks for your work and for your blog posts (the process posts and composition ones are invaluable). I wanted to ask you something about sketching city streets - I love your sketches of old European cities (I am living in Lisbon now!). What is the process for them? Do you draw directly in pen, or you first establish some perspective lines and shapes on the paper with a pencil? Thanks!

A

LISBON IS SO BEAUTIFUL I am impossibly jealous.

Answer: When I draw in my sketchbooks I draw straight ahead with permanent tools like prismacolor black pencils:

image

or ink pens:

image

because they help me commit to my lines.

Also, I never throw down perspective lines when drawing from life. Sometimes I hold up my pencil to check my angles, but mostly I’m about the broad strokes.  This is why my houses all look condemned:

image

Have fun drawing in BEAUTIFUL LISBON!

-Jake

1979semifinalist:

Super cool new STORYKILLER art of Micah, Brand, and Jeff by the fantastic Jake Wyatt.

Limited edition prints of this are available. 40 Hours left in the Kickstarter, so now’s the time to commit!

See above.

Q

brainjail asked:

First, thanks for leading me to Old City Blues, looks good! I like the MGS fan art, and I'm curious when in the creative process you decided to skip on the faces? I'm sure you know Mike Mignola does it a whole bunch, and I was wondering what you consider "the right time"? Thanks.

A

That’s a good question! Short answer: I like drawing faces, plan to keep drawing faces for a long time to come. But the last drawings I’ve posted have been SUPER TINY, and when a head (or any object) gets too small to render with appeal, I drop the level of detail.

Long answer: there are a few major principles that inform those decisions.

The first principle, I guess, is that draftsmanship (the accurate linear representation of forms and detail) should be subordinate to design (deliberate editorial choices in representation). Just because you CAN draw something doesn’t mean you have to, or that you should. Or that you shouldn’t. Mignola is a great one to bring up here, and I’m glad you did!

The first cover for Seed of Destruction is RAD. And you can really see Mignola’s draftsmanship coming through. He’s drawing the hell out of that toolbelt. He’s drawing the hell out of that gun, that statue, that chain, and every damn fold in that jacket. He is DRAWING. We should all try to draw that well!

image

The first cover to Hellboy in Hell is RAD. And you can really see Mignola’s design coming through. He designs the hell of that composition, isolating Hellboy in a field of black. He’s designing the hell out of those figures, eliminating extraneous detail and letting the gesture tell the story. He’s paring down and doing more with less. He is DESIGNING. We should all try to design that well.

image

Both approaches are really effective, but only because Mignola is both a great draftsman AND a great designer. Even detail-heavy guys, like Ueyama, will simplify when a figure shrinks to a certain size, and it becomes more appealing to remove detail than add it. Ueyama draws the shit out of EVERYTHING, but he never lets his (frankly incredible) draftsmanship override his design.

image

SO yeah. Draw really well. And be conscientious about how you design your drawing, how you bring your skills to bear, what you include and what you excise. There’s really not a ‘right’ answer to draftsmanship vs design, as long as you’re making conscious decisions. The only wrong answer is to thoughtlessly draw without even considering the question.

The other principle is that the right gesture can say it all. You can say almost anything with a figure that you could say with a face. You don’t need a close-up to show emotion or character. Drawing is communication, and if you’re doing it right, gesture can be the whole sentence, with the face as punctuation. Michael Dudok De Wit is a master of this. Check out his film, Father and Daughter. So much emotion. No faces.

I tried to pull  off faceless acting in my own film a few years ago, with mixed success.

So, yeah. Once you’re prioritizing design over draftsmanship, and comfortable with gesture as expression, you can just make whatever call you like! Faces and figures, details and deletions, all are YOURS TO COMMAND!!!

It’s your drawing, right? Own it!

-Jake Wyatt

A little fanart of Solid Snake, Major Kusanagi, and Solano.
Been playing through MGS4 and it’s got me thinking about Giannis Milonogiannis’s Old City Blues. Giannis built his New Athens on this crossroads where Kojima, Shirow, and Nihei’s work all intersect, and then made that place completely his own. Now I can’t think about any of their work without bleeding into his a little bit, and that’s a good thing— his work is fantastic.
Giannis is on tumblr, and you can read his comic online.
Drawn in ink on paper by Jake Wyatt A little fanart of Solid Snake, Major Kusanagi, and Solano.
Been playing through MGS4 and it’s got me thinking about Giannis Milonogiannis’s Old City Blues. Giannis built his New Athens on this crossroads where Kojima, Shirow, and Nihei’s work all intersect, and then made that place completely his own. Now I can’t think about any of their work without bleeding into his a little bit, and that’s a good thing— his work is fantastic.
Giannis is on tumblr, and you can read his comic online.
Drawn in ink on paper by Jake Wyatt

A little fanart of Solid Snake, Major Kusanagi, and Solano.

Been playing through MGS4 and it’s got me thinking about Giannis Milonogiannis’s Old City Blues. Giannis built his New Athens on this crossroads where Kojima, Shirow, and Nihei’s work all intersect, and then made that place completely his own. Now I can’t think about any of their work without bleeding into his a little bit, and that’s a good thing— his work is fantastic.

Giannis is on tumblr, and you can read his comic online.

Drawn in ink on paper by Jake Wyatt

I wrote and drew a short for Boom’s Regular Show #9 that came out this week. This is the first page. The rest is at your comic shop, probably.
For some reason I draw Mordecai like he’s Big Bird’s burnout cousin? I think they have the same eyes and beak.
-Jake I wrote and drew a short for Boom’s Regular Show #9 that came out this week. This is the first page. The rest is at your comic shop, probably.
For some reason I draw Mordecai like he’s Big Bird’s burnout cousin? I think they have the same eyes and beak.
-Jake

I wrote and drew a short for Boom’s Regular Show #9 that came out this week. This is the first page. The rest is at your comic shop, probably.

For some reason I draw Mordecai like he’s Big Bird’s burnout cousin? I think they have the same eyes and beak.

-Jake

Aragog for Wizarding Wednesday. Playing with a pilot pen my mom gave me. She knows what I’m about.

Q

ziggy9911 asked:

Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

A

*STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

Okay. Let’s do this.

1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…image

K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

image

Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

image

And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:image

Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

image

Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

4. Draw environments from life.

I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

image

Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

image

Layered, interior spaces:

image

You get the idea.

image

Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

image

Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

image

4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you.

-Jake Wyatt

This week’s Necropolis share. I’m not 100% on this design. It needs work. And I’m pretty sure I lifted everything but the fur and armor from Sushio and Tetsuro Ueyama. Buuut hey I suspect that I steal most of what I draw from somebody or another so whatever.

Also, I’ve gotten some really good art asks, so I might answer one of those for next week’s development post.

Would y’all rather hear about art education, perspective in composition, or drawing the figure?

Cleaned up one of my rough designs for Necropolis Issue 2. The Third Sword age 12. Cleaned up one of my rough designs for Necropolis Issue 2. The Third Sword age 12.

Cleaned up one of my rough designs for Necropolis Issue 2. The Third Sword age 12.

A young Quirinus Quirrell hunts a mountain troll.
For this week’s topic on Wizarding Wednesday. A young Quirinus Quirrell hunts a mountain troll.
For this week’s topic on Wizarding Wednesday. A young Quirinus Quirrell hunts a mountain troll.
For this week’s topic on Wizarding Wednesday.

A young Quirinus Quirrell hunts a mountain troll.

For this week’s topic on Wizarding Wednesday.

Hey, this thing I drew is going to be in the Dragonball Zine, which you can now order HERE!
EVERYONE IN IT IS AMAZING and I’m thrilled that I was included. It’s full of monsters like:
Adrian Bloch Alexandre Diboine Andrew Schick Babs Tarr Ben Sears Choo Corey Lewis David Alegre Disa Wallander Dudu Magalhãess Emily Partridge Jacob Canepa Jasmine Monterroso Jenn Woodall Joanna Krótka Joe Wierenga Kat Bride Katie So Leslie Hung Luis NCT MAIS2 Maxence Henry Mike Jones Natalie Hall Olivier Menanteau Randy Godawa Ricardo Bessa Richie Pope Sachin Teng Sean Dockery Stefan Tosheff T-Wei Wren McDonald
Isn’t that ridiculous?  It’s gonna be so great!
-Jake Hey, this thing I drew is going to be in the Dragonball Zine, which you can now order HERE!
EVERYONE IN IT IS AMAZING and I’m thrilled that I was included. It’s full of monsters like:
Adrian Bloch Alexandre Diboine Andrew Schick Babs Tarr Ben Sears Choo Corey Lewis David Alegre Disa Wallander Dudu Magalhãess Emily Partridge Jacob Canepa Jasmine Monterroso Jenn Woodall Joanna Krótka Joe Wierenga Kat Bride Katie So Leslie Hung Luis NCT MAIS2 Maxence Henry Mike Jones Natalie Hall Olivier Menanteau Randy Godawa Ricardo Bessa Richie Pope Sachin Teng Sean Dockery Stefan Tosheff T-Wei Wren McDonald
Isn’t that ridiculous?  It’s gonna be so great!
-Jake

Hey, this thing I drew is going to be in the Dragonball Zine, which you can now order HERE!

EVERYONE IN IT IS AMAZING and I’m thrilled that I was included. It’s full of monsters like:

Adrian Bloch 
Alexandre Diboine 
Andrew Schick 
Babs Tarr 
Ben Sears 
Choo 
Corey Lewis 
David Alegre 
Disa Wallander 
Dudu Magalhãess 
Emily Partridge 
Jacob Canepa 
Jasmine Monterroso 
Jenn Woodall 
Joanna Krótka 
Joe Wierenga 
Kat Bride 
Katie So 
Leslie Hung 
Luis NCT 
MAIS2 
Maxence Henry 
Mike Jones 
Natalie Hall 
Olivier Menanteau 
Randy Godawa 
Ricardo Bessa 
Richie Pope 
Sachin Teng 
Sean Dockery 
Stefan Tosheff 
T-Wei 
Wren McDonald

Isn’t that ridiculous?  It’s gonna be so great!

-Jake

jasonlatour:

A few Jean Grey School Portraits by Jake Wyatt. 

Drawing Hisako wearing a Gundam for armor was maybe the most fun I had in the month of March.  So excited to read Latour’s take on the Jean Grey School. jasonlatour:

A few Jean Grey School Portraits by Jake Wyatt. 

Drawing Hisako wearing a Gundam for armor was maybe the most fun I had in the month of March.  So excited to read Latour’s take on the Jean Grey School. jasonlatour:

A few Jean Grey School Portraits by Jake Wyatt. 

Drawing Hisako wearing a Gundam for armor was maybe the most fun I had in the month of March.  So excited to read Latour’s take on the Jean Grey School. jasonlatour:

A few Jean Grey School Portraits by Jake Wyatt. 

Drawing Hisako wearing a Gundam for armor was maybe the most fun I had in the month of March.  So excited to read Latour’s take on the Jean Grey School.

jasonlatour:

A few Jean Grey School Portraits by Jake Wyatt. 

Drawing Hisako wearing a Gundam for armor was maybe the most fun I had in the month of March.  So excited to read Latour’s take on the Jean Grey School.